The U.S momentum to build “green” is rapidly gaining popularity, with the office market currently leading the way toward more sustainable structures. The construction industry, including the publishers of form construction contracts, is scrambling to keep up. ConsensusDOCS, a relatively new group of industry organizations that is promoting a family of contract forms that have…

U.S. courts in recent years have imposed stricter obligations on individuals sitting as arbitrators to disclose to the parties fully any facts or circumstances that may give rise to doubts about their impartiality or independence. As a result, the arbitrators’ mantra has become “disclose, disclose, disclose.” Indeed, it has become fairly common in arbitrations under…

While arbitration is often touted as being a less expensive alternative to litigation, the initial cost of initiating arbitration has always been considerably more expensive than filing in court. Typical filing fee in a U.S. court is a few hundred dollars, while administering authorities typically have filing fees in the thousands of dollars. The American…

Problems with drywall imported from China during the ill-fated U.S. housing boom continue to be front and center in the southeastern U.S., as complaints continue to roll in regarding health problems allegedly caused by the tainted wallboard, as well as damage to electrical and plumbing work. Naturally enough, a significant litigation boom has followed, including…

Cash-flow from lender to owner to construction manager to subcontractors is the lifeblood of any construction project. And maintaining a sufficient flow of funds is essential to every construction manager’s ability to manage the job. Contract provisions requiring a contractor or subcontractor to continue to work, even if the right to payment is disputed, mean…

Enforcement of arbitration awards in the United States in substantial matters is governed by the Federal Arbitration Act, 9 U.S.C. § 1, et seq. (FAA). A closely related statute found at 9 U.S.C. §§ 201-208 contains specific provisions for international awards rendered under the New York Convention, but the FAA also governs those proceedings unless…

During the 2004-07 housing boom, approximately 309 million square feet of Chinese-made drywall was imported into the United States. Since that time, nearly 1,000 lawsuits have been filed alleging that the imported drywall contains sulfur compounds which, when exposed to heat and moisture, release sulfurous acids resulting in the corrosion of metal components, such as…